BUILDING HISTORY

MASONIC LODGE 

 

1925 – 1984

The Neo-Classical Revival style building which houses the Sherman Jazz Museum was originally the Masonic Lodge Temple – used by the Masons for 60 years. When construction was begun in 1924, this was one of the largest Masonic halls in the state of Texas. The Sherman Chapter was organized in 1842, making it one of the oldest organizations in Grayson County. The lodge was named for the distinguished Colonel William Barret Travis, commander at the Alamo. Throughout the restoration process for the Jazz museum, diligent effort was made to retain the original architectural style, keeping many of the original doors, floors, ceiling fans, hardware and lighting. In 1984, the building was listed in the Sherman Preservation publication, Preserving Architectural Heritage and subsequently sold to Bill Collins Jr. who used it as a location to store and display American Victorian walnut furniture.

 

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AMERICAN VICTORIAN WALNUT FURNITURE MUSEUM 

1925 – 1984

The Masonic Temple building housed what was possibly the largest collection of American Victorian walnut furniture in America. Bill Collins Jr. began collecting and restoring the furniture as a way of investing his money into a non-inflationary asset since the US left the gold standard in 1971. By 1992 Bill’s parent’s antique collection had appreciated quite a bit, so much so that they had it appraised by a professional appraiser and donated the collection to the Collins-Binkley Foundation, Inc., a foundation begun by Bill Collins Jr. and Margaret Binkley Collins in 1982. They then moved everything into the old 1924 three story Masonic Temple they had bought in 1985 and opened it as a furniture museum in 1992.

 

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JAZZ MUSEUM 

 

1925 – 1984

With the passing of his parents by 2008, Bill acquired the building and his sister acquired the furniture. Bill’s passion lies in jazz education and preservation so naturally he assembled the collection and converted the entire building into the Sherman Jazz Museum.

 

Building History
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One of the things I like about jazz, kid, is I don’t what’s going to happen next. Do you?

Bix Beiderbecke

Bix Beiderbecke

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The building is NOT wheelchair accessible. PLEASE Watch your step!